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Wednesday, October 23, 2013

I ate where John F. Kennedy ate

Seafood is essential to Boston's very being. Living near the ocean affords you to have plenty of digs brimming with the catch of the day.  But only one place turns fresh-from-the-ocean fare into a history lesson: Ye Olde Union Oyster House.

JFK ate here. Already, I'm sold on the place. The American president and icon (and personal hero of mine) loved to feast in privacy in the upstairs dining room. His favorite booth "The Kennedy Booth" has since been dedicated in his memory.

Billed as the oldest restaurant in Boston and the oldest restaurant in continuous service in the U.S., the doors have been open to diners since 1826. The building itself was built around 1704 and has been designated as a National Historic Landmark. Before it became a restaurant, a dress goods business occupied the property. In 1771, printer Isaiah Thomas published his newspaper, The Massachusetts Spy, from the second floor. The restaurant originally opened as the Atwood & Bacon Oyster House on August 3, 1826.

During the revolution the Adams, Hancock, and Quincy wives, often sat in their stalls of the dress goods business sewing and mending clothes for the colonists. In 1796 Louis Philippe, king of France from 1830 to 1848, lived in exile on the second floor. He earned his living by teaching French to many of Boston's fashionable young ladies. America's first waitress, Rose Carey, worked there starting in the early 1920s. Her picture is on the wall on the stairway up to the second floor. The toothpick was said to have been popularized in America starting at the Oyster House.

Along with great history comes good food. Take a seat at the raw oyster bar on the main floor or try the dinning room which serves up rich and creamy clam chowder, sweet scallops and live Maine lobsters as well as poultry, baked beans, steak and chops.

As popular with locals as it with tourists, the Union Oyster House is ripe with history and awash in seafood standards. It's a mandatory stop to complete your authentic New England experience.









41 Union St, Boston, MA 02108, United States





















Union Oyster House on Urbanspoon












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